Book Review: William Penn, A Life by Andrew R. Murphy

Jon Kershner wrote a review of William Penn, A Life, by Andrew R. Murphy (Oxford University Press, 2018), a book which marked the 300th anniversary of Penn’s death and focuses primarily on his political career. The text also “carefully corrects some of the previous mischaracterizations of the nature of the relationship between Lenape and the early Quaker settlers,” according to Kershner. Check out the rest of the review by purchasing a copy of QRT’s Fall 2019 issue here. Have you read William Penn, A Life? What did you think of it?

Book Review: William Penn, A Life by Andrew R. Murphy

QRT #133 – The Concept of Hierarchy and Doing Ministry in the Church: Evaluating the Roles of Leaders and the Use of Authority in Quakerism – by Oscar Lugusa

Oscar Lugusa Malande wrote “The Concept of Hierarchy and Doing Ministry in the Church: Evaluating the Roles of Leaders and the Use of Authority in Quakerism” for the Fall 2019 issue of QRT. With experience as a pastor and chaplain in Vihiga Yearly Meeting in Kenya, as well as teaching and serving as academic dean of Friends Theological College Kaimosi, he provides insight into the challenges and opportunities of the Friends understanding of authority and ministry leadership in general, and particularly how it is being received and interpreted in an African context. He interviewed Friends from several East Africa countries, and shares some of their opinions and insights. He also offers thoughts about the differences between pastors’ and clerks’ leadership, and the need for close collaboration.

QRT #133 – The Concept of Hierarchy and Doing Ministry in the Church: Evaluating the Roles of Leaders and the Use of Authority in Quakerism – by Oscar Lugusa

QRT #133 – Oregon Yearly Meeting and the Peace Testimony, Part I: Navigating Evangelicalism and Quakerism, 1938-1954, Part I – By Cherice Bock

In the first of a two-part series, Cherice Bock contributed “Oregon Yearly Meeting and the Peace Testimony, Part I: Navigating Evangelicalism and Quakerism, 1938-1954,” based on interviews and archival research she conducted with her late grandfather, Ralph Beebe. In this article, Bock details Oregon Yearly Meeting’s approach to the peace testimony during World War II and the Korean War, and shares the stories and beliefs of Quaker men faced with the military draft in these years. She analyzes the balance between particularly Quaker beliefs and evangelicalism in this yearly meeting as Evangelical Friends began.

QRT #133 – Oregon Yearly Meeting and the Peace Testimony, Part I: Navigating Evangelicalism and Quakerism, 1938-1954, Part I – By Cherice Bock

QRT Issue #133 – Affirmation Mysticism: The Activist Theology of Rufus Jones by Christy Randazzo

Christy Randazzo “Affirmation Mysticism: The Activist Theology of Rufus Jones” in the Fall 2019 issue of Quaker Religious Thought

Christy Randazzo contributed “Affirmation Mysticism: The Activist Theology of Rufus Jones” to the Fall 2019 issue of QRT. Through an exploration of the social activism of Jones through his involvement with the American Friends Service Committee, combined with his mystical Quakerism, Randazzo highlights the interdependent and social theology of Jones, and of Quakerism as a whole. Order your copy of this issue today at https://qtdg.org/subscribe.

QRT Issue #133 – Affirmation Mysticism: The Activist Theology of Rufus Jones by Christy Randazzo

Fall 2019 issue #133 Is Out

The fall issue of Quaker Religious Thought is now out:

Our lastest issue is heading to your mailbox! Contributors include David Harrington Watt, James Krippner, Christy Randazzo, Cherice Bock, Oscar Lugusa Malande, and Jay Miller. Need to order your copy or subscribe? Go to: https://qtdg.org/subscribe

Henry Cadbury, the Peace Testimony, and the First World War by James Krippner and David Harrington Watt

Co-authors James Krippner and David Harrington Watt of Haverford College wrote: “Henry Cadbury, the Peace Testimony, and the First World War,” which appeared in the Fall 2019 issue of QRT. They ask, “How did twentieth-century Friends understand the nature of the so-called Peace Testimony?” Recognizing this is a large question, they approach it through looking at the life of influential Friend Henry Cadbury (1885-1973), attending to his understanding of peace, and the difficulties he faced even among Friends as he spoke out against WWI and was forced to resign from Haverford. Krippner and Harrington Watt compare Cadbury’s experiences and beliefs to those of early Friends.

Order your copy of this issue of QRT (and former issues!) at https://qtdg.org/subscribe.

Fall 2019 issue #133 Is Out

Quaker Theological Discussion Group, 2019 Program

Quaker Theological Discussion Group, 2019
American Academy of Religion/Society of Biblical Literature Annual Meeting
San Diego, California

Session I: Friday, November 22, 2019 4:30-6:00 pm|
Hilton Bayfront – 206 (Second Level)

Panel: Quaker Youth Ministry and Theopraxis in a Multicultural Context.
Roger Nam, Trisha Welstad, Steve Sherwood, Leah Payne, Joel Mayward, Hannah Souter, George Fox University

Respondent: Nim Njuguna, Woodbrooke Quaker Study Center

Session II: Friday, November 22, 2019 7:00-9:00 pm
Marriott Marquis-Oceanside (South Tower – First Level)

Quakers Reading Scripture
“Read Within”: Margaret Fell and Scripture
Michael Birkel, Earlham School of Religion

The “Mystic Sense” of Scripture as taught by Hannah Whitall Smith: Nineteenth Century Quaker Bible Teacher
Carole Spencer, Portland Seminary of George Fox University

Inspiring Readings of the Inspired Text—Taking the Bible Personally, After the Manner of Friends
Paul Anderson, George Fox University

“Hearing to Speech”: A Participatory Theology of Word-Dwelling as Congregational Formation in God’s Mission
David Hahn, Northwest Washington Synod ELCA and Luther Seminary

**All QTDG sessions are free and attenders do not need to register for the AAR/SBL Annual Meeting.

Quaker Theological Discussion Group, 2019 Program

Seeking Contributors: New Critical Studies on Quaker Women, 1800 – 1920: Finding New Voices

The corpus of Quaker women’s history and literature offers one of the most fascinating studies of gender across all centuries and continents. This small group of women pioneers, activists, prophets, and writers has often been at the grassroots of revolutionary movements, fuelling and propelling the way for global, monumental change. The 2018 release of Michele Lise Tarter and Catie Gill’s New Critical Studies on Early Quaker Women, 1650 – 1800 (Oxford University Press) demonstrates the potential for strong, innovative interdisciplinary scholarship on the influence of these women. This project seeks to follow that successful volume and its focus on gender in Quaker studies to gather an interdisciplinary body of writers with a shared interest in reassessing nineteenth-century Quaker women, highlighting new discoveries and interpretations about their literary creation, historical landmarks, and transatlantic movements.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Women and the expansion of Quakerism
  • Women’s socio-political positions within Quaker theology and culture
  • Women and nineteenth-century religious schism
  • Women’s Meetings (as a site of power, autonomy, change)
  • Women and Quaker print culture
  • Women on the margins of Quakerism (geographic or theological)
  • Women and social reform (e.g. abolition, suffrage, prison reform)
  • Women and war
  • Women and Language
  • Women and Prophetic Performance
  • Religio-political writings by women, Autobiography and “convincement”
  • Dissent and identity studies
  • Women, leadership, and networking
  • Lesser known Quaker women
  • Women Friends’ influence on other religious sects and communities

Please submit proposals of approximately 500 words, along with a curriculum vita, to: Robynne Rogers Healey (robynne.healey@twu.ca) and Carole Dale Spencer (spencca@earlham.edu) by 15 March 2019. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Seeking Contributors: New Critical Studies on Quaker Women, 1800 – 1920: Finding New Voices